Retro Remakes

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So apparently RE4 and Code Veronica are coming to the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 in Japan, together on one disc in a super awesome fun sexy disc of insanity.

Whilst I’m sure the compilation will eventually make its way West — there’s really no reason why it shouldn’t — I’ll probably abuse my credit card further and import the Japanese version (it’s been SNES retro month for me. First up, a $50 copy of Robocop vs. Terminator! *facepalm*).

Resident Evil 4 is a very awesome game and, as Ben noted accurately in the above-linked news article, if you haven’t already played it you’re the worst gamer ever.

I’m going to go into it thinking I am just that, and that I haven’t played the game in full a total of five times (twice on Gamecube, twice on Wii and once on PS2). That way, the experience will be that little bit more fun and exciting, just as it was when it was first released on the Gamecube back in 2004 (holy crap that feels like ages ago!).

With this new revelation (and it hasn’t even been officially announced yet), I started thinking about other classic games that deserve porting over to present-day consoles, if not to see how the games would look in HD, then to introduce the classics to younger and new gamers.

The first game that popped into my head was Ico, although that is already planned for a PS3 porting alongside Shadow of Colossus. Viewitiful Joe is one that also came to mind, and it would be awesome to see that appear on XBLA and PSN, although Capcom has stated in the past that it has no future plans for the popular young character.

I could list game after game that I’d like to see ported, but I always end up feeling a little conflicted; some games, like Final Fantasy VII, should not be ported, instead remembered and experienced just as they were intended.

Below I’ve listed three games I hope to one day see ported with upgraded graphics and gameplay:

Viewtiful Joe and Viewtiful Joe 2

Gamecube : PlayStation 2

Both Viewtiful Joe games look and sounded superb whilst also being devilishly hard. They are two of my favourite platformers/beat-em-ups ever, and I highly recommend both to anyone that has a PS2 or Gamecube (the Gamecube versions look and control considerably better than the PS2 versions). I would love to see this series return, or least have these two games ported over to 360 and PS3. Wii gameplay would also be interesting. Double Trouble on DS is good, but just not the same…

Shenmue

Dreamcast

Supposedly one of the most expensive games ever made, Shenmue helped define the sandbox open-world genre. It didn’t quite do as well as expected, but it’s still a fantastic game in its own right. A sequel has been teased for years, but until then, a remake or porting will suffice just fine!

Timesplitters 2

Gamecube, PS2, Xbox

The Timesplitters franchise is as good as it gets for the FPS genre…or at least back during last generation. The gameplay is still fun these days though, and it’s obvious that contemporary FPS games took inspiration from the Timesplitters games. Just ask Crytek.

So apparently RE4 and Code Veronica are coming to the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 in Japan, together on one disc in a super awesome fun sexy disc of insanity.

Whilst I’m sure the compilation will eventually make its way West — there’s really no reason why it shouldn’t — I’ll probably abuse my credit card further and import the Japanese version (it’s been SNES retro month for me. First up, a $50 copy of Robocop vs. Terminator! *facepalm*).

Resident Evil 4 is a very awesome game and, as Ben noted accurately in the above-linked news article, if you haven’t already played it you’re the worst gamer ever.

I’m going to go into it thinking I am just that, and that I haven’t played the game in full a total of five times (twice on Gamecube, twice on Wii and once on PS2). That way, the experience will be that little bit more fun and exciting, just as it was when it was first released on the Gamecube back in 2004 (holy crap that feels like ages ago!).

With this new revelation (and it hasn’t even been officially announced yet), I started thinking about other classic games that deserve porting over to present-day consoles, if not to see how the games would look in HD, then to introduce the classics to younger and new gamers.

The first game that popped into my head was Ico, although that is already planned for a PS3 porting alongside Shadow of Colossus. Viewitiful Joe is one that also came to mind, and it would be awesome to see that appear on XBLA and PSN, although Capcom has stated in the past that it has no future plans for the popular young character.

I could list game after game that I’d like to see ported, but I always end up feeling a little conflicted; some games, like Final Fantasy VII, should not be ported, instead remembered and experienced just as they were intended.

Below I’ve listed three games I hope to one day see ported with upgraded graphics and gameplay:

Viewtiful Joe and Viewtiful Joe 2

Gamecube : PlayStation 2

Both Viewtiful Joe games look and sounded superb whilst also being devilishly hard. They are two of my favourite platformers/beat-em-ups ever, and I highly recommend both to anyone that has a PS2 or Gamecube (the Gamecube versions look and control considerably better than the PS2 versions). I would love to see this series return, or least have these two games ported over to 360 and PS3. Wii gameplay would also be interesting. Double Trouble on DS is good, but just not the same…

Shenmue

Dreamcast

Supposedly one of the most expensive games ever made, Shenmue helped define the sandbox open-world genre. It didn’t quite do as well as expected, but it’s still a fantastic game in its own right. A sequel has been teased for years, but until then, a remake or porting will suffice just fine!

Timesplitters 2

Gamecube, PS2, Xbox

The Timesplitters franchise is as good as it gets for the FPS genre…or at least back during last generation. The gameplay is still fun these days though, and it’s obvious that contemporary FPS games took inspiration from the Timesplitters games. Just ask Crytek.